Category Archives: Exhibition

Exhibition

Perpetual Uncertainty: Umeå

Bildmuseet, Umeå, Sweden, 2 October 2016- 16 April 2017

Perpetual Uncertainty / Contemporary Art in the Nuclear Anthropocene brings together artists from Europe, Japan, the USA and Australia to investigate experiences of nuclear technology, radiation and the complex relationship between knowledge and the deep time.

The artworks explore how nuclear weapons and nuclear power has influenced our interpretation of concepts such as archives, memory, knowledge and time. How can we understand and visualise the ungraspable timeframe of radioactive half-life? How can we archive and communicate knowledge about radioactivity from generation to generation, hundreds of thousands of years into the future?

Curated by Ele Carpenter (Goldsmiths/Arts Catalyst), with artists: James Acord, Shuji Akagi, Lise Autogena & Joshua Portway, Erich Berger and Mari Keto, Nick Crowe and Ian Rawlinson, Don’t Follow the Wind, Finger Pointing Worker, Dave Griffiths, Isao Hashimoto, Erika Kobayashi, David Mabb, Cécile Massart, Eva and Franco Mattes, Yelena Popova, Susan Schuppli, Shimpei Takeda, Kota Takeuchi, Thomson & Craighead, Suzanne Treister, Andy Weir, Robert Williams and Bryan McGovern Wilson, and Ken + Julia Yonetani.

The exhibition includes a programme of films, open discussions and talks by researchers and experts. The film programme presents art films, documentaries and feature film by Todd Chandler, Jeff Stark, Eva and Franco Mattes, Merilyn Fairskye, Nina Fischer and Maroan el Sani, Peter Galison and Rob Moss, Karen Kramer, Akira Kurosawa, Fredrik Oskarsson, Cécile Massart, and Jane and Louise Wilson.

The exhibition is accompanied by The Nuclear Culture Source Book, a collaboration between Bildmuseet, Arts Catalyst and Black Dog Publishing.

Finding Treblinka: London

Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust & Genocide, 6 July – 15 September 2016

The Wiener Library’s new exhibition will explore the Nazi labour and extermination camps of Treblinka using the ground-breaking research of Staffordshire University archaeologist Dr Caroline Sturdy Colls and artistic responses to the topic curated by Michael Branthwaite.

For the first time in the UK, this archaeological work will be adapted and displayed along with specially commissioned artworks by Michael Branthwaite, Janine Goldsworthy, Dave Griffiths, Hilary Jack and Jenny Steele.

Through the team’s unique, predominantly non-invasive approach, a more accurate picture of the camps has emerged. At the same time, religious and ethical considerations surrounding their investigation have been respected. This work allowed the old gas chambers, mass graves and a large number of objects to be located. The innovative exhibition includes highlights from the Library’s collections, such as a contemporary map of Treblinka, Nazi documentation and testimony from survivors. It examines the history and architecture of the camps and the forensic archaeological process that helped reveal the camp’s history. The exhibition also explores the application of art as a means to provide access to scientific and historic data.

Finding Treblinka: Poland

Museum of Struggle and Martyrdom in Treblinka, 2 August – September 2015

Curated by Caroline Sturdy-Colls & Michael Branthwaite: “Finding Treblinka includes new physical evidence uncovered at the sites of the former Nazi extermination and labour camps during a seven-year research investigation undertaken by staff from Centre of Archaeology at Staffordshire University, which have shed new light on the nature of the Nazis’ crimes. A temporary exhibition Finding Treblinka: Artists Respond accompanies the permanent installation, representing an innovative collaboration in which artists have responded to archaeological findings from both the extermination and labour camps. The opening of the exhibitions will feature a commemoration ceremony, and takes place on the 72nd anniversary of the Treblinka revolt.

The artists responses have been driven by their individual practice and concerns over how specialist scientific information can be communicated to a wider audience. The show focuses on how artists can create new discourses and dialogues that create change in the way we think about history and its relationship with the present. It explores how we process and build histories around objects, and how science and art can come together to enhance public knowledge about sensitive and traumatic events.

The artworks range from text-based wall works to free standing sculpture. Re-appropriated objects also feature, such as a re-upholstered chair exhibiting motifs from the objects found during the excavations at Treblinka. Since the objects found during these excavations will remain at the site, the artworks will eventually provide a travelling surrogate, offering viewers a conversational experience that will also hopefully encourage people to visit Treblinka”.

Archaeological research by Caroline-Sturdy Colls, with artists Michael Branthwaite, Janine Goldsworthy, Dave Griffiths, Hilary Jack and Jenny Steele.

Film Material Toast

ToastWillHost, Federation House, Manchester, 10-12 April 2015, 6-9pm Friday for performances, exhibition continues 12-6pm Sat-Sun.

FILM MATERIAL presents performance and screenings to mark the ending of artistic labour at Federation House. We co-operatively respond to Co-operative’s NOMA land-bank, bought and sold since 1843. A critical rehearsal of ideas about land, time, precarity and work.



Kelvin Brown’s cassette archive Johannesburg Tapes captures stories about South African music, exploring the fractured histories of the city.  Clara Casian shows her cut-up documentary Corridor2, about the 1970s Manchester radical publisher Savoy Books. Jacob Cartwright & Nick Jordan’s Off the Trail, filmed in the former military defences and rural Beat hangout of San Francisco. Ahmed & Carpenter’s Observing (the Work of Amateurs) documents their amateur academic labour in writing a conference paper.  Chris Paul Daniels glimpses lives of residents and workers from Birmingham’s Digbeth and Bordesley communities, in his recent film You are Here. In Desert SitesJoe Duffy shows Super 8 shot at the Star Wars Saharan film sets. Using multiple 35mm projectors to perform Society for Visual Education, Dave Griffiths depicts globalised labour through an archive of geography filmstrips, and Sam Meech creates Knit RGB Disco using a Brother knitting machine. Plus Black Fever-Flitters, a live video smokescreen & audio improv by James Snazell.

Film Material Soup #12: Rogue

Rogue Open Studios, 1st floor, 19-21 September 2014,

Film Material Soup presents recent work in photography, CCTV, microfilm and stereoscopic slides by Chris Paul Daniels, Sam Meech (2nd floor), Joe Duffy, and Dave Griffiths. Plus a 1.5 hour screening programme, interspersed by remixes from Chris and Sam, featuring Annie Carpenter, James Snazell, Nick Jordan and Jenny Baines.