Category Archives: Workshop

Workshop

Art & Deep Time Radiation: Umeå

Roundtable Discussion, Bildmuseet, Umeå University, Sweden, 19 November 2016

A discussion about art and the deep time of radiation to accompany the Perpetual Uncertainty exhibition. Short presentations by artists and nuclear scholars will take place in the Bildmuseet Flexi-hall, followed by a series of small roundtable discussions bringing together a range of disciplinary perspectives on the nuclear, including artists and people working on the long-term storage of radioactive waste in Europe. The event is inspired by James Acord’s roundtable that he built in his Hanford studio, USA 1999, to bring together environmentalists and people from the nuclear industry to discuss the clean up of the Hanford site.

Introduced by Ele Carpenter and chaired by John O’Brian, with Roundtable facilitators in Bildmuseet and HumLab: Thomson & CraigheadDeep Time Consultation, Jantine SchröderRemote Sensing Radiation, Susan Schuppli; Nuclear Anthropocene, Peter C van Wyck; Intergenerational responsibility, Johan SwahnCamera Atomica: Radiation and Photography, John O’Brian; Deep Time Microfiche, Dave Griffiths.

Invited participants will include artists, film-makers, activists, policy makers, professionals engaged in nuclear research and radioactive waste management. In addition members of the public with an interest in nuclear issues, deep time, art and radiation will be able to buy tickets online.

Nuclear Cultures: HADES

Arts Catalyst & Z33 House for Contemporary Arts, Belgium, 11 – 13 July 2016

A field trip to HADES, Belgium’s underground research lab in Mol, for geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Organised by Nuclear Cultures project in with Z33 (Hasselt), and ONDRAF/NIRAS (Belgian agency for radioactive waste and enriched fissile materials), artists Kota Takeuchi, Andy Weir, Dave Griffiths and curators Ils Huygens and Ele Carpenter spent 3 days visiting Z33 and meeting Christoph Depaus, Maarten Van Geet and Jantine Schröder at SCK.

I organised Deep Field [Club Golf Nuclea Mol] – an art-science golfing dialogue reflecting on time as underground moles in the HADES research bunker, and re-enacting leisure pursuits of post-war nuclear workers. I’m collecting thoughts and feelings on future mattering of time and space implied by burying, and co-existing with, nuclear waste. I’m producing content for Deep Field [Unclear Zine], a microfiche fanzine collaging poetry, drawing, data, photographs and interviews that attempts to translate the contemporary radioactive waste repository for far-future readers, as a folkloric site of conflict and unknowing. 

The HADES lab was constructed in 1980, at 255 metres underground, to research possibilities of geological disposal in deep clay strata. Like underground facilities in France, Sweden and Japan, the research lab is not intended to be used as a final repository for radioactive waste. Hades is also the Greek god of the underworld.

 

Sit, I Don’t: Manchester School of Art

16 June 2016, Manchester School of Art 

Interactive Arts badgeSit, I Don’tIA Symposium #1 is an event exploring the innovative perspective that BA Interactive Arts (Manchester School of Art) occupies as a model of education and a collection of singular practices. The symposium is organised by Helen Collet, Olivia Glasser and Dave Griffiths.

Through taking an autonomous stand on the formation of their art-school educational experiences, comes the freedom for our students to discover and place new practices in wider contexts: Your adventure in the force of creativity translates into productive action in the world”.  The symposium features presentations by guest speakers and recent graduates, plus exchanges of practices between a cross-section of current students. Plus the launch of Interactive Arts’ Badge Campaign.

With: Kim McAleese (Grand Union), Rob Carter & Lauren Velvick (ECLUB), Darren Murphy (Forma) and Sarah Unwin (FutureEverything).  The symposium title, Sit, I Don’t stems from ‘Stand, I Don’t’; the Charles Esche/de Appel CP interview in Curating and the Educational Turn (eds. P. O’Neill & M. Wilson, 2010) around understanding art and the educational realm.

BRÖKE: Manchester

Manchester Art Gallery, 14 May 2015, 6-9pm, freeBROKE

BRÖKE was a student-curated engagement project organised by Dave Griffiths and Chara Lewis with Kate Jesson as part of Manchester School of Art’s Unit X.  BRÖKE culminated in a Thursday Late gallery takeover event in response to MAG’s summer design-based exhibitions, House Proud and Eastern Exchange.  During two weeks immersion in the learning programme, students observed public engagement in the gallery, and critically discussed issues raised by both shows – including the borders between design and art practices, and questions of value, austerity, consumerism and sustainability. The event included interactive engagement, tours, video and  interventions by the students and invited artists, including a furniture delivery performance, making and parading a quilt banner, plus netsuke, upcycled pallets, ideal interior design, percussion & song, and kintsukuori workshop using smashed ceramics.

Centre for the Imagination: Manchester

Manchester Art Gallery, 22 May 2014, 6-9pm, free

Centre for the Imagination was a student-curated event organised by Dave Griffiths and Lewis Sykes with Kate Jesson as part of Manchester School of Art’s Unit X project, which culminated in a Thursday Late response to Ryan Gander‘s exhibition, Make every show like it’s your last. During 2 weeks immersion in the gallery’s learning and engagement programme, Unit X students observed and critically discussed gallery education – in particular how children and adults communicate and participate in learning situations. They visited Manchester’s art storage and conservation facilities, heard from curators about programming Joanna Vasconcelos and Sculptural Forms: A Century of Experiment, and received a briefing on the upcoming Ryan Gander show.

 

Centre for the Imagination was a gallery takeover responding to themes of childhood creativity inherent in Gander’s practice. The event included interactive and multimedia work by the students, gallery interventions by James Ackerley and Olivia Sparrow, Art Bar by Katy Morrison, performances by socialist magician Ian Saville and bands TE YatesPOST, animation by Joe Whitmore, a zine fair, and radical publications displayed by Exhibition Centre for Life and Use of Books. Documentary by Jack Norris.