Deep Field [The Photographic Universe] 2012 Castlefield installation view (by AdeleMyers)

Deep Field [The Photographic Universe]

Microdot lightbox installation, 3650 x 2400 mm
“History […] is a progressive transcoding of images into concepts, a progressive elucidation of ideas, a progressive disenchantment (taking the magic out of things), a progressive process of comprehension.” Vilém Flusser, Towards a Philosophy of Photography
Deep Field [The Photographic Universe] connects the present-day city with the early universe, via the invention of microdots in Victorian Manchester. With advice from the Astrophysics Research Institute of Liverpool John Moores University, and in response to the dimensions of Castlefield Gallery’s double-height wall, this pseudo-planetarium samples a 40 degree point of view in the southerly sky, to present an information space for navigation and observation. Around 450 deep-field galaxies have been mapped and images collected from online databases such as Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Simbad and Galaxy Zoo, also based on catalogues compiled by early modern astronomers Herschel and Dreyer, from hundreds of international observers dating from antiquity to modernity. A disenchantment and communal commemoration of material reality made possible by photography.

Wall drawing, telescope, microdot light boxes

“History […] is a progressive transcoding of images into concepts, a progressive elucidation of ideas, a progressive disenchantment (taking the magic out of things), a progressive process of comprehension.” Vilém Flusser, Towards a Philosophy of Photography

Deep Field [The Photographic Universe] connects the present-day city with the early universe, via the invention of microdots in Victorian Manchester. With advice from the Astrophysics Research Institute and in response to the dimensions of Castlefield Gallery’s double-height wall, this pseudo-planetarium samples a 40 degree POV in the southerly sky, presented as an information surface for navigation and observation. Around 450 deep-field galaxies were and images collected from online databases such as Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Simbad and Galaxy Zoo. Using catalogues compiled by early modern astronomers Herschel and Dreyer, and hundreds of international observers dating from antiquity to modernity, it explores the disenchantment, and communal commemoration, of material reality brought about by photography.